Tag Archives: Passion

Blogging about Passions or Passionately Blogging?

While going through all the posts I have uploaded on this blog since it’s launch almost nine years ago, I came across this particular post from October 2008.  It reminded me of the difficult few years during which I struggled between blogging about the things I passionately wanted to blog about and blogging about the various passions I knew would get me more readers.

This is a struggle I see a lot around me, as many young women start up blogs with the hope that it will become a money-making machine, only to remove it from the internet years, even months later because the fire ran out.

While some lucky bloggers manage to have a passion that appeals to enough people to shine the light of success on their endeavours, most struggle to strike gold.  But that seems to be the problem in the first place: these bloggers try to appeal to the masses by blogging about topics that are popular, rather than by learning to craft their art in such a way that they become popular because of who they are.  They are letting the public’s passion mould them, rather than moulding the public’s passion with the strength of theirs.

Focusing one’s attention to what is mainstream in this day an age is quite dangerous.  For one, the tide being as strong as it is, a curious look into mainstream might sweep you right along with the rest of them.  Had I succumbed to the temptation of blogging about popular topics, I might have been an internationally well-known blogger by now, but I wouldn’t be blogging about my passions.  How happy would I be?

Another reason to not step into mainstream interests online, as defined by Google Trends, is that oftentimes, the spectacularly bad is particularly trendy.  I can’t help but wonder how much of one’s sense of hope turns into despair in these conditions.  This feeling is further compounded by the fact that superficial and unimportant news seems to make for most of the other news trends.  How then, one might get caught thinking, is there any hope for the future when these things are considered “news”?

A third reason has to do with the way reports are written.  I feel like more often than not, news stories are written in such a way to generate a passionate response.  And even if it isn’t, beware of the comment section.  Reading such things takes its toll as precious emotional energy goes into completely unimportant things.

Yet another reason has to do with effecting change.  I have heard many (including myself) hypothesising that if they become famous, they will have an influenceable voice that they can then use to effect change.  But if you become famous for a superficial reason, how much weight will your voice carry when discussion weighty matters?

Of course, this is quite the black-and-white scenario.  We can’t segregate ourselves from mainstream interests.  Similarly, there are some Google Trends that we should take note of.  Furthermore, some individuals, who became famous for superficial reasons, have learned to use their voice in a powerful way.  But ultimately, my advice to a girl-next-door who wants to become a world-renown blogger is that she should consistently upload quality content about something she is incredibly passionate about, content that she then should market diligently and systematically.  Maybe her blog about a more serious matter will not attract as many people as would a more superficial blog, but she will remain true to her passion and will effect change within the small community that bands together around her content.

{ Sahar’s Blog is all about being in a constant state of learning.  So it only made sense for me to go back to all my previous posts and see how my thoughts on certain topics have changed over the last nine years.  In this new, ongoing series of posts, I’ll be rereading some of my older posts and reflecting on the same topic in light of what I’ve learned since then.  It’s going to be very interesting to see how things have changed! }

Music Review: Nick de la Hoyde – ‘Passion’ EP

Sydney, Australia’s 21-year-old Nick de la Hoyde brings together the sounds and vibes of hip-hop, pop, soul, R&B, and spoken word, creating a collection of songs both unique in their breadth and depth, yet approachable and radio-friendly. His debut EP, Passion, features single “The Longest Way”, the result of a collaboration with Chicago-based hip-hop producer Lemoyne Alexander (who worked with the likes of R. Kelly and Aaliyah).

The almost soft and ethereal “Aces” opens things up. Listeners are introduced to two realities: that de la Hoyde can both sing and rap. The pop, R&B, and hip-hop track moves between emotional band boy ballad and passionate rap artist which we soon discover seems to be de la Hoyde’s preferred formula. While “Aces” is nothing remarkably unique in the current soundscape of popular music, it is a strong, pleasant beginning to the EP. “By My Side” is just as predictable and enjoyable. Listeners start feeling secure that de la Hoyde’s great rapping flow and soulful singing are a rule and not an exception. The chorus is particularly catchy both in style and in content, and the light groove of this song carries through its entirety, building up towards the last burst of energy which closes the tune.

“The Longest Way” adds two great new elements to de la Hoyde’s music: guitars and thumping drums. It’s a call to remain true to one’s dreams and to remain hopeful despite the despair the structures of society seem to actively encourage. While the flow is just as flawless, the rapping is a little more laid-back, making it more interesting for audiences typically not interested in the genre. There is a certain joy and lightness in this track that leaves listeners uplifted long after it ends.

The smooth “Passion” brings things down, opening with toned down rapping and a simple piano line. One layer a time, including a synthesiser and drums, the song builds up to a—what else—passionate ending. The closing “No Consolation” brings back tighter rapping laid on a funky and upbeat melody. It has an almost rock-like quality, with a pop chorus that lies on the contemplative side, which comes as an interesting contrast to the rest of the song. Of particular note is the electric guitar line that launches the last moments of the track.

With a sound that embraces a collection of genre and lyrics that read like journal entries, Nick de la Hoyde has put together an EP that will resonate with many a fan, as his following of well over 100,000 on Instagram can attest to. Tracks are available for streaming on Bandcamp. More information is available on his official website; follow Nick on Twitter and Instagram.

Pictures provided by Independent Music Promotions.
First published here on Blogcritics.

Music Review: Nick de la Hoyde – ‘Passion’ EP

Music is a powerful form of art.  It always has an influence on our mind and on our soul.  In the context of constantly trying to contribute to one’s own personal development as well as to the development of our communities, music can be quite a potent ingredient.  But what kind of music?  How often?  How should we consume it?  I started reviewing music in an attempt to figure these questions out, and it’s even tougher than I thought it would be.  So: challenge accepted 😉

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Nick de la Hoyde
Sydney, Australia’s 21-year-old Nick de la Hoyde brings together the sounds and vibes of hip-hop, pop, soul, R&B, and spoken word, creating a collection of songs both unique in their breadth and depth, yet approachable and radio-friendly. His debut EP, Passion, features single “The Longest Way”, the result of a collaboration with Chicago-based hip-hop producer Lemoyne Alexander (who worked with the likes of R. Kelly and Aaliyah).

The almost soft and ethereal “Aces” opens things up. Listeners are introduced to two realities: that de la Hoyde can both sing and rap. The pop, R&B, and hip-hop track moves between emotional band boy ballad and passionate rap artist which we soon discover seems to be de la Hoyde’s preferred formula. While “Aces” is nothing remarkably unique in the current soundscape of popular music, it is a strong, pleasant beginning to the EP. “By My Side” is just as predictable and enjoyable. Listeners start feeling secure that de la Hoyde’s great rapping flow and soulful singing are a rule and not an exception. The chorus is particularly catchy both in style and in content, and the light groove of this song carries through its entirety, building up towards the last burst of energy which closes the tune.

“The Longest Way” adds two great new elements to de la Hoyde’s music: guitars and thumping drums. It’s a call to remain true to one’s dreams and to remain hopeful despite the despair the structures of society seem to actively encourage. While the flow is just as flawless, the rapping is a little more laid-back, making it more interesting for audiences typically not interested in the genre. There is a certain joy and lightness in this track that leaves listeners uplifted long after it ends.

The smooth “Passion” brings things down, opening with toned down rapping and a simple piano line. One layer a time, including a synthesiser and drums, the song builds up to a—what else—passionate ending. The closing “No Consolation” brings back tighter rapping laid on a funky and upbeat melody. It has an almost rock-like quality, with a pop chorus that lies on the contemplative side, which comes as an interesting contrast to the rest of the song. Of particular note is the electric guitar line that launches the last moments of the track.

With a sound that embraces a collection of genre and lyrics that read like journal entries, Nick de la Hoyde has put together an EP that will resonate with many a fan, as his following of well over 100,000 on Instagram can attest to. Tracks are available for streaming on Bandcamp. More information is available on his official website; follow Nick on Twitter and Instagram.

Pictures provided by Independent Music Promotions.
First published on Blogcritics.